Police in Minnesota round up journalists covering protest, force them on the ground and take pictures of their faces

Law enforcement has not learned it’s lesson–especially in Minnesota:

Approximately 500 protesters were marching peacefully until around 9 p.m. when an incident triggered police to start using chemical irritants such as tear gas, pepper balls and projectiles, Jasper Colt, a photojournalist with the USA TODAY Network, reported.

After about 30 minutes, law enforcement told protesters to the leave the area in a loudspeaker announcement calling the demonstration an unlawful assembly. The crowd thinned out, and a small number of protesters and media were left.

“A lot of journalists like myself were slow to leave the area,” Colt said. “We didn’t think we needed to, and we wanted to cover what was happening.”

Colt described police then corralling protesters and media into one group and yelling for them to get “flat on our stomachs.”

Source: USAToday

Police accused of threatening, pulling gun on Black Army lieutenant during Virginia traffic stop

Here we are again. Another near situation where a black man is either shot or is threatened or beaten for the most minor of charges. And then the body cam is released to the public months or years later:

Virginia police pulled guns on a Black Army officer during a traffic stop and threatened to execute him in a parking lot, according to the serviceman’s lawsuit and video of the encounter.

U.S. Army Lt. Caron Nazario was driving Dec. 5, 2020, in his newly purchased Chevrolet Tahoe when he encountered police on U.S. Highway 460 in Windsor, about 30 miles west of downtown Norfolk, the active-duty soldier claimed in a federal civil lawsuit filed last week. He was in uniform at the time of the stop.

Nazario, who is Black and Latino, conceded in his complaint that he didn’t immediately pull over. He instead put on his emergency lights and continued for another 100 seconds, driving under the speed limit, so he could safely park in a well-lit gas station parking lot less than a mile down the road.

Video shows Maryland police handcuffing, berating 5-year-old boy

Law enforcement has obviously not learned any lessons despite all the protests against police mistreatment of people of color. And the politicians continue do nothing about it:

Newly released body camera footage shows two Maryland police officers handcuffing and berating a 5-year-old boy who had allegedly left school without permission.

The Montgomery County Police Department released the video on Friday. It was recorded in January 2020 and contains disturbing content.

“I watched in horror as what can only be described as a nightmare unfolded for nearly an hour,” Montgomery County Council member Will Jawando said in a tweeted statement. “It made me sick.”

Keller residents Demand Accountability for Cop who ordered man Arrested, Pepper Sprayed

And why weren’t these cops fired?

The Keller police chief and mayor assured the community Tuesday night that the arrest of a man who was filming his son’s arrest over a traffic violation was an unacceptable, but isolated, incident.

The arrest and subsequent pepper spraying of Marco Puente gained national attention after the family filed a lawsuit against two Keller officers. The entire incident was video recorded on multiple dash cam and body worn cameras. The Keller police chief apologized for his officers’ behavior two days later and said they were in the wrong, according to a federal lawsuit Puente and his attorneys filed against the officers on Dec. 15.

Officer Blake Shimanek, previously a sergeant with the department, ordered Officer Antik Tomer arrest and pepper spray Puente on Aug. 15 while Puente filmed his son’s arrest. Puente, an emergency electrician who grew up in Keller, was left without medical attention for 15 minutes.

Ohio police officer fired in fatal shooting of Black man

The press is giving this shooting very little coverage. It’s almost as if it doesn’t really count unless there is a dramatic video that goes viral. Police know this and don’t turn on their bodycams:

A white Ohio police officer was fired Monday after bodycam footage showed him fatally shooting 47-year-old Andre Hill — a Black man who was holding a cellphone — and refusing to administer first aid for several minutes.

Columbus police officer Adam Coy was fired hours after a hearing was held to determine his employment, Columbus Public Safety Director Ned Pettus Jr. said in a statement.

“The actions of Adam Coy do not live up to the oath of a Columbus Police officer, or the standards we, and the community, demand of our officers,” the statement read. “The shooting of Andre Hill is a tragedy for all who loved him in addition to the community and our Division of Police.”

Coy remains under criminal investigation for last week’s shooting.

Another “I Can’t Breathe” Victim to Police Violence in Texas

Javier Ambler

This case did not get media attention. Because if no video then it really didn’t happen. The media needs video:

Javier Ambler was driving home from a friendly poker game in the early hours of March 28, 2019, when a Williamson County sheriff’s deputy noticed that he failed to dim the headlights of his SUV to oncoming traffic.

Twenty-eight minutes later, the black father of two sons lay dying on a north Austin street after deputies held him down and used Tasers on him four times while a crew from A&E’s reality show “Live PD” filmed.

Ambler, a 40-year-old former postal worker, repeatedly pleaded for mercy, telling deputies he had congestive heart failure and couldn’t breathe. He cried, “Save me,” before deputies deployed a final shock.

His death never made headlines.

USAToday.com

There was a coverup by law enforcement. Why? Maybe he was killed for no reason?

Records obtained by the KVUE Defenders and the Austin American-Statesman reveal that deputies used Taser stun guns on him at least three times, even as he told them multiple times that he had a heart condition and could not breathe.

The circumstances of Ambler’s March 28, 2019, death have never been revealed. The Williamson County Sheriff’s Office tried to shield information from release since receiving its first request in February.

Ambler’s death was ruled a homicide, which officials said include “justifiable homicide.” Medical examiners listed his cause of death as congestive heart failure and hypertensive cardiovascular disease associated with morbid obesity “in combination with forcible restraint,” according to an in-custody report filed with the Texas Attorney General’s office. The report included no other details about Ambler’s autopsy, which hasn’t been released, but noted that he did not appear to be intoxicated by drugs or alcohol.

KVUE.com

This is the bodycam video:

Police Violence Report (6-6-20)

Police brutality directed against protesters protesting the death of George Floyd is frightening. And shows why we need to keep protesting.

Just as shocking as this video is the decision by over 50+ police officers throwing a tantrum and quitting the police force.

Continue reading “Police Violence Report (6-6-20)”

Seattle cop caught on video with knee on neck of George Floyd protestor

They’re not getting it:

In a video posted to Twitter, a Seattle police officer was caught placing his knee on the neck and head of a George Floyd protester in much the same manner that led to the death of the Minneapolis man that has led to the nationwide protest.

In the video, the man, clad in a bright orange sweatshirt, is forced to the ground by two police officers who are seen holding down as they put restraints on him. During the incident, one officer uses his knee to hold the man down, causing onlookers to yell at the cops, “Get your f*cking knee of his neck!” as the man begged for help.

Legal Doctrine “Qualified Immunity” Shields Police from Accountability

George Floyd

It could get off George Floyd’s killers:

But when Floyd’s family goes to court to hold the officers liable for their actions, a judge in Minnesota may very well dismiss their claims. Not because the officers didn’t do anything wrong, but because there isn’t a case from the Eighth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals or the Supreme Court specifically holding that it is unconstitutional for police to kneel on the neck of a handcuffed man for eight minutes until he loses consciousness and then dies.

And such a specific case is what Floyd’s family must provide to overcome a legal doctrine called “qualified immunity” that shields police and all other government officials from accountability for their illegal and unconstitutional acts.